The College of Medicine at The Texas A&M University System Health Science Center has been named one of the top 10 medical schools in the United States for Hispanics by Hispanic Business Magazine. Ranked number four on the list, the A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine is noted for its commitment to diversity within the student body.
“We are deeply honored to be recognized by Hispanic Business as one of the top medical schools in the country for Hispanics,” Dr. Christopher Colenda, Dean of the College of Medicine, said. “This recognition is a testament to our wonderful faculty and staff, as well as to our students, who practice the values of the college every day. The college offers a highly personalized educational experience reflecting our diverse backgrounds, and it is wonderful to be recognized for that.”
The top 10 as named by Hispanic Business are as follows: 1) Stanford University School of Medicine; 2) Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; 3) University of New Mexico School of Medicine; 4) Texas A&M University System Health Science Center College of Medicine; 5) University of North Texas Health Science Center Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine; 6) University of Kansas School of Medicine; 7) University of Arizona College of Medicine; 8) East Carolina University Brody School of Medicine; 9) Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine; and 10) Ohio State University College of Medicine & Public Health.
For the 2004-2005 academic year, the college is noted to have an enrollment of 289 students, including 30 Hispanics, which comprises approximately 10 percent of total enrollment. The College of Medicine awarded 61 degrees last year, including one Hispanic recipient, or two percent of the graduating class.
“I am especially excited about the recognition our College of Medicine has received from Hispanic Business as one of the Top 10 Medical Schools for Hispanics,” Assistant Dean for Admissions Filo Maldonado said. “We have worked hard to redesign the admissions process to allow us to continue selecting applicants from underrepresented minority groups who fit the mission of the institution. By enrolling more qualified underrepresented and disadvantaged applicants, we have the opportunity to promote better access to health care and to help fulfill medicine’s obligation to serve society’s needs.”
According to Hispanic Business, the A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine believes diversity in the health professions is critical to rectify disparities in health care. As part of a commitment to diversity, the college administers the Joint Admissions Medical Program, open to highly qualified students from economically disadvantaged backgrounds. The Student National Medical Association, one of 16 nationwide chapters, is the oldest and largest medical student organization dedicated to people of color and underserved communities. Other organizations include Minority Issues in Medicine and Empower: Students for Diversity and Social Justice. The curriculum offers classes in medical Spanish. The school believes diversity is not solely limited to race and ethnicity, but also encompasses talents, life skills and special attributes.
Hispanic Business Magazine informs and represents the most highly educated, affluent and influential segment of the booming Hispanic market through integrated channels of print, online and events. With a primary circulation of 230,000 and a total audience of over one million readers, Hispanic Business reaches CEOs, business owners, corporate decision makers and professionals in all sectors, including business, law, accounting, health care, government and engineering. Widely recognized as an industry-leading publication, Hispanic Business has been the recipient of numerous prestigious awards, and articles are regularly syndicated by the New York Times and quoted by the Washington Post, Miami Herald, Los Angeles Times, USA Today and Advertising Age, among others.

— Marketing & Communications