Marcia Ory, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Marcia Ory, Ph.D., M.P.H.

Regents and Distinguished Professor Marcia Ory, Ph.D., M.P.H, has been selected to receive the Lifetime Achievement Award by the Aging and Public Health Section of the American Public Health Association (APHA).

“Her record speaks for itself, and we feel that her amazing accomplishments exemplify what this award represents,” states Lene Levy-Storms, Ph.D., M.P.H, past-chair of the Aging and Public Health Section.

Ory is an international leader in healthy aging, community-based prevention and wellness research. She has made substantial contributions to identifying factors associated with healthy aging as well as implementing and disseminating evidence-based programs for improving the health and functioning of older adults. Working collaboratively with a variety of community, state and national partners she has advanced the science of public health translational research. She is also known for her excellence in mentoring the next generation of scholars and practitioners. She has authored or co-authored 10 edited books, 35 book chapters, served as guest editor for 20 journal issues, and published over 300 articles.  Additionally, she has generated more than $1 million annually in expenditures for research and service. She was previously awarded at the Phillip G. Weiler Award for Leadership in Aging and Public Health. She has also received the Texas A&M Health Science Center’s Presidential Award in Research selected for this honor from nominees from the colleges of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, and nursing.

She will be honored at the APHA 2014 Annual Meeting in New Orleans on November 17.

— Rae Lynn Mitchell

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