Is it bad to sit in a wet bathing suit?

Is it bad to sit in a wet bathing suit too long?_Yeast infection_a man and a women, both wearing bathing suits, hold hands and walk into the ocean.
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Whether yeast infection or chemical irritation, a Texas A&M College of Medicine OB-GYN explains the importance of changing out of a wet bathing suit.

Episode Transcript

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Howdy everybody. Welcome to Sounds Like Health! This is Mary Leigh Meyer.

Sam Craft:
And I’m her co-host, Sam Craft.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
We are here today with Dr. Hector Chapa, a board certified OB-GYN, clinical assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Medicine, and the assistant clerkship director for OB-GYN for the College of Medicine. He was with us a few months ago and you’re back! Welcome!

Hector Chapa:
I am back. It’s kind of like a nightmare. I keep popping up.

Sam Craft:
He never leaves.

Hector Chapa:
I never leave.

Sam Craft:
He’s just next door.

Hector Chapa:
Absolutely true.

Sam Craft:
He’s just next door. No big deal.

Hector Chapa:
I get my mail here. It’s weird. The reason I am back…I’m glad to be here, so I appreciate the invitation to come back. As you guys know, this is our passion and we love this. Yes, I’m a physician. I’ve got my practice and that’s rewarding, but medical education, whether it’s on a podcast or in one of our classrooms with our medical and nursing students, because we’re thinking outside the box, now. Listen guys, this is what it’s about. It’s a commitment as healthcare providers, whether you’re a nurse, EMT or physician, we need to teach. We need to encourage and promote safe health practices. So, you give me a topic and I’m going to be there.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Even if it’s a not very fun topic like the one we have today.

Hector Chapa:
Oh, this is a great topic! Super exciting.

Sam Craft:
It’s definitely off topic for us I think.

Hector Chapa:
But vital still.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Yup. So, drum roll…

Hector Chapa:
What’s the topic?

Mary Leigh Meyer:
What happens when you sit in a wet bathing suit too long?

Hector Chapa:
Hey, it’s summer. It fits right?

Sam Craft:
It’s just like when your hands get all wrinkly. You’re in the water too long.

Hector Chapa:
I like that feeling. I like the wrinkly finger feeling.

Sam Craft:
Go on…

Hector Chapa:
Well, I think I’ve said too much already, but it is timely. Think about it, because you’ve done it. I’ve done it. If you’re in the car listening to this, you know you’ve done it. You’re guilty, because we’re busy. We take our kids to the beach, which we’ll talk about in a minute. We go get ice cream and it’s three hours later and nobody has changed, but do you know that this can actually affect some aspects of our health? It’s true. Now I’ve got to give a big disclosure here. The honest truth is this is probably not going to end up with somebody going to the hospital or the ICU and that’s good. But nonetheless, just because it doesn’t mean you have to go to the emergency room, it can still affect your quality of life. It can still give you some discomfort. It can still give you some issues in the remaining days that follow after that trip to the beach. So, we wanted to prevent that. So yeah, what happens when you sit in a wet bathing suit is timely—not the most fun and exciting—but still useful. So, we’re going to cover that here.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
It can happen to everybody.

Hector Chapa:
Don’t get the idea that this is a gynecologist sitting here giving the advice for women. We’ll cover that. But absolutely, this has to do with children’s health, toddlers, adolescents and men can get some of the same effects that we’ll cover and we’ll make that distinction in our podcast. So, to be very clear, yes an OB-GYN is behind the mic with the team here. This is not just gynecology. Sitting in a wet bathing suit, let me give you the most medical word, can be gross. Don’t do it. Go change. Take clothes with you for heaven sakes and we’re going to get into that right now.

Sam Craft:
Gets really cold too.

Hector Chapa:
You know what? Once again, I like that.

Sam Craft:
Okay, fair enough.

Hector Chapa:
We’re going to go into a next personal therapy session after this, so we’ll keep the going.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
The value of sweaters.

Sam Craft:
Tight sweaters.

Hector Chapa:
That’s right. All right. What do you guys think about this? When you guys think of sitting in a wet bathing suit, I mean, yes, it’s cold, it’s uncomfortable, it’s kind of itchy. Is that it?

Sam Craft:
Well, I’ve never actually thought about the health ramifications of sitting in a wet bathing suit besides wrinkly fingers or your legs feel weird or whatever. I’ve never thought about anything past that. I didn’t know it could be dangerous to my health.

Hector Chapa:
Yeah.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
For me, my parents have always told me that I should go change and I’ve always heard that you shouldn’t do it…sit in a wet bathing suit.

Hector Chapa:
But no reason why.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Yeah, and nothing ever happened and no reason why. Is it just a rumor or a myth that my parents believe or is something actually going to happen?

Hector Chapa:
Well, let’s get into that right away. Not a myth. Remember, we’re assuming that everyone listening, as the vast majority, we wish people to be healthy. We’re talking about a healthy population. They’re not immune to these problems. Everyone is vulnerable, but think about that. Things that we’re going to discuss right now. What if you have uncontrolled diabetes, high sugar in your system? What if you’re taking some medications that are impacting your immune system? Some people have things like rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis that they take medications called immune modulators, so that their immune systems are a little wonky…a little vulnerable. Then they go do this. You’ve got to be careful guys. You’ve got to be careful. So, while everybody’s vulnerable, especially in that most vulnerable group—kids, another most vulnerable group—you’re asking for it. So, let’s get right into it right away. Is that okay?

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Yeah, absolutely.

Hector Chapa:
Alright, so sitting in a wet bathing suit, besides the squishy wishy feeling that you get, the issue really becomes what is it behind the bathing suit. So, think about our body temperature, think about moisture from the bathing suit. We’ve got two issues there, that some things, some little invaders, just love. We’ve already covered it. Moisture and it’s dark. There’s no light behind that bathing suit. So, you’ve got dark and damp and moist. That is a great opportunity for fungi—that’s yeast—to just have a party. That is the perfect remedy, that perfect recipe rather, to have a great skin, and for women, vaginal yeast infection.

So, let me go over that. Everybody has some type of yeast on our skin. We all have it both in our mouth, of course. For women, there’s some amount of yeast always in the vagina. That’s why little babies, when they get very vulnerable, that yeast, for example, in their mouth can overgrow and they get this little white coating over their mouth. Anybody know what that’s called? Starts with a T.

Sam Craft:
I forget it, but my kid had it.

Hector Chapa:
For sure. Super common.

Sam Craft:
I can’t remember what it’s called though.

Hector Chapa:
It’s thrush.

Sam Craft:
Thrush. That’s right.

Hector Chapa:
That’s yeast. So, guys, we all have it. We have it. So why are we looking for opportunities to make it grow and have a party? Let’s just keep it in check. So damp, moist bathing suits, if you don’t change, is a prime opportunity for skin yeast infections that can give you some skin irritation, itching of the skin and a rash.

For women, it actually can throw off the yeast population internally. Okay, so skin is external, but for women…then again, as we talked with Sam earlier, this is a medical podcast and I’m a gynecologist, so let’s just get the word knocked out early. Okay? Are you ready? Ready. Brace yourselves. If you’re driving, pull over. Okay. Vagina. There it is, Sam.

Sam Craft:
Yep, there it is.

Hector Chapa:
I did it. That was the first vagina drop right here in the podcast.

Sam Craft:
You’re a doctor. You can say it. That’s okay.

Hector Chapa:
It throws off the vaginal, what now we know and is termed in medicine and you’ll see a lot in print, called a microbiome. This environment that we all have that actually serves as a barrier, little microbes that we have that are working with us actually to keep us healthy, but in the wrong environment can actually work against us. So, having this moist, warm bathing suit can throw off the vagina microbiome, so you don’t just get yeast on the skin, but women can get a vaginal yeast infection.

Thankfully, they’re not going to end up usually in the intensive care unit, but it affects quality of life and affects intimate relationships. It’s money spent, either on over the counter medications or a doctor’s visit in the clinic. That’s one thing. But let that sit in there for a minute before we go on to other issues.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
What is a yeast infection? What are the symptoms people should look for? Or, say you get out on the pool and you sit down-

Hector Chapa:
Exposure.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
How long does it take?

Sam Craft:
How long does it take to get something like that?

Hector Chapa:
So that’s good. So first of all, let’s do skin yeast infections. So, skin yeast infections, which can actually happen to men as well. They don’t change from their bathing suit. They can get skin yeast infection in the inner thighs. All right? That usually has a little red, a little scaly, a little raised patch. So, in gym, they always said after gym, in high school gym, you got to change out of your shorts. Got to change back into your clothes because if you’re not, you’re going to get this diagnosis and it’s two words. The second one is itch. The first one is? Y’all are killing me. Is this thing on? Is this thing on?

Sam Craft:
Is it jock itch?

Hector Chapa:
That’s it. Jock itch is yeast. That’s what jock itch is. The medical term is tinea corporis, or tinea cruris, specifically, in the creases of the leg. Believe it or not, jock itch is skin. That’s what we’re talking about.

Sam Craft:
Is that like your legs being chapped? Is it the same concept?

Hector Chapa:
A little bit different. Now we’re going to get into that next, so that’s chafing or chapped. It can be, but specifically, yeast infection of the skin usually has a rash, very itchy, and guess what happens when you scratch it? It feels good for the second. What do you think that yeast is going? Right to the areas that don’t have it. It’s very easy to spread.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
So interesting because you don’t often hear the word yeast with men. I feel like it’s very synonymous with women.

Sam Craft:
Never have I heard that.

Hector Chapa:
Oh, let me break it down even further. A little bit broader than that, why you change out of your wet shoes. Because you can get scaly, little crackling skin between the toes. What is that called?

Sam Craft:
Trench foot.

Hector Chapa:
Trench foot.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Athletes’ foot.

Hector Chapa:
Or athletes’ foot. But we’re talking about the same deal. What does that both condition? It is yeast. So that is a tinea pedis.

Sam Craft:
Had no idea.

Hector Chapa:
Tinea means yeast. So, we’re talking about the same issue guys. The whole point is our bodies love water. We need water, but too much of it on our skin can throw off the microbiome and these things can pop up. So vaginal yeast infections, vulvar or groin or inguinal yeast infections, further medical terms…on the lay terms, jock itch. If you get a little yeast on your skin, sometimes they can look like a little weird ring, what people call ringworm.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Is that yeast also?

Sam Craft:
Ringworm’s not a worm?

Hector Chapa:
That’s yeast. That’s a form of tinea.

Sam Craft:
Had no idea.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
I didn’t think it was an actual worm, but I didn’t know, I guess never thought it was.

Sam Craft:
I didn’t think what it actually was.

Hector Chapa:
Our job is done. Ringworm is, and you throw that off to a patient for a new diagnosis, especially on their child, they’re like, my son doesn’t have worms. Relax lady…hold on a minute. It’s the ringworm has to do with how it looks. It looks like a ring, and because it’s not very concentric, not very symmetrical, it’s irregular, like a worm. So, ringworm, easy to treat. But all this is proof that our bodies are always carrying this yeast microorganism, but it’s got to behave. If we give it the opportunity to misbehave, like children, they’re going to take it, and that’s where things get out of hand.

So, sitting in a wet bathing suit for our first issue to discuss, is the issue of fungi or yeast. Typically, of course, we’re talking in the intimate areas, which can be obviously even more uncomfortable. So, for men, jock itch, for women, yeast infection of the labia, the outer part of the vagina, or even internally for a vaginal yeast infection.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Do you need a prescription to fix it or is there an over-the-counter?

Hector Chapa:
For sure. Over the counter things are great, but as always, as a physician, we have that thin line. Almost a little unease or discomfort by letting patients treat themselves, because we don’t want to waste time for something that they may have worse than a yeast infection. We’re going to cover that right now.

But for sure there’s a list, a laundry list of products. Just walk down aisle X, Y or Z at Walgreens or CVS…not an endorsement for either pharmacy. You can find your list of any kind of topical yeast, both in creams or powders. They all are effective, but as always, if you ever self-treat and not better by a determined amount of time, there’s usually two, max three days, you got to get that checked. Because outside of yeast, as we break now for the next section…it could be a bacterial infection and that is harder to treat with over-the-counter. That may need evaluation and a prescription.

Sam Craft:
A lot of people self-treat and end up making the situation worse than if they had just went and saw a doctor beforehand. I know a lot of the other topics we’ve talked about that is definitely been the case in certain things.

Hector Chapa:
I’ve got to be clear. Look man, I am not against over-the-counter stuff. We have our many, I’ve got three kids at home, our bathroom cabinet is mini-aisle two of Walgreens. That’s what it is and that’s okay. That’s what it’s there for because no one has the time or the expense to go to a doctor for quote…just a yeast infection. When it becomes problematic is when you don’t go for just a yeast infection and it’s something else. So, use your best judgment if you get better, great. But if it doesn’t, as always, the great medical advice is seek medical attention.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
I feel like if you noticed you’re starting to get red and scaly down there, I would hope you would…

Sam Craft:
At least ask a friend.

Hector Chapa:
Right. Maybe not show your friend, but you can ask your friend. Unless you’re really close.

Sam Craft:
Is this weird, or is it just me?

Hector Chapa:
Right, and also please be careful with the physician, the universal physician, Dr. Google, because immediately you’re going to think you have leprosy and you probably don’t. So just be careful with that. Sam likes that one.

Sam Craft:
Well, no, it’s…

Hector Chapa:
It could be leprosy.

Sam Craft:
You get on a search engine and, say, Oh, I think I’m coughing a little bit and my side hurts. You have cancer.

Hector Chapa:

Of course. No, of course. Number one, has to be.

Sam Craft:
I just thought I had the flu.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Or allergies.

Hector Chapa:
Erase, erase.

Sam Craft:
Maybe it’s just hay season. I don’t know what’s going on.

Hector Chapa:
So be careful with Dr. Google. Now the other issue as we talked about briefly, as we move on, is yeast is a big deal, probably the most common issue here with sitting in a wet bathing suit, but yeast cousin is bacteria and I’m sure you guys watch the news, you hear the news, bacteria in water. It isn’t just something about the oceans or rivers. There’s bacteria in pools, guys. Well, wait a minute, hold on. That’s not true. There’s chlorine in the pool. For sure, but you’re banking on the fact that the chlorine is in the right concentration and that somebody taking care of the pool.

So yes, there’s chlorine in it, which is our third topic we’ll get to in a minute. That’s chemical irritations from the bathing suit. But just because there’s chlorine in the water, it doesn’t mean that all bacteria are going to get killed. That’s why kids get swimmers ear. That’s from bacteria. So even though the pool has chlorine and chemicals to keep it “clean”, there’s still stuff that can be in there. Bacterial infections are also real, and for women that can include bacterial vaginal infections, like one called bacterial vaginosis, discharge. It’s uncomfortable and it’s things that you have to deal with from a day in the pool. This should be something that to have fun with, not something that’s going to follow you home for three to seven days later. There’s even some evidence that sitting in a wet bathing suit, because it throws off the microbiome—the little friendly bacteria by the urethra, where urine exits the body—because of its proximity to the vagina, that bacterial overgrowth there can lead to UTI. So urinary tract infection.

So just from a trip to the pool, man. That’s not fair. The whole idea, it comes down to two words, personal hygiene, it’s just part of it. The topic, why I really wanted to do it is, it’s not about the bathing suit, it’s about personal hygiene and taking the time to take care of your body.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
So is drying off sufficient?

Hector Chapa:
The idea is to separate yourself from that wet material, because how many know that 100 percent cotton makes a terrible bathing suit. It just doesn’t work. Think about…

Sam Craft:
All bad.

Hector Chapa:
That’s probably not going to sell.

Sam Craft:
All bad.

Hector Chapa:
It’s all synthetic material and synthetic material doesn’t let your skin breathe.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
It takes forever to dry.

Hector Chapa:
Of course, and so that’s the issue, just like we teach our young female patients in gynecology, best type of underwear, little panties for women, typically some kind of cotton blend because it can breathe. So, this isn’t just about the wet bathing suit. There’s nothing wrong with the synthetic material panties, that’s fine. But you can’t do that necessarily every day. The same concept applies. Why? You’re keeping moisture in, it’s dark, so the same issues apply. Actually, one of the nonmedical treatments for recurrent vaginal yeast infections is change your underwear if that’s the issue. Try to change the material that you use so that things can wick away and dry.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
So a reoccurring vaginal…wait, did you say yeast infection?

Hector Chapa:
Yes, yes, for sure.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Okay, so are some people more prone to them?

Hector Chapa:
Oh, absolutely. So, once you have a yeast infection, just like the bacterial vaginal infection that we’ve covered, bacterial vaginosis, the good news is easy to treat, guys, easy to treat.

The not so good news is they like to come back. They like their visit, they tend to recur. The amount of recurrence is based on a host of factors, personal hygiene and overall health status. So, the uncontrolled diabetic, obviously, because high sugar impacts the immune system ability to fight infection, everybody knows that, they’re more prone. Certain medications, more prone. Pregnancy. Pregnancy is another condition that’s more prone to have recurrence. Why? There’re hormonal factors there. During pregnancy, you have slight increase in your body temperature, you tend to have little bit more moisture and secretions. You see what we’re talking about, see how we’re coming back? It’s all circling to the same issues. So, this is why this actually was a good topic, Mary Leigh, because bathing suit, wet bathing suits is the catch under the umbrella of overall hygiene, overall health care, and just being aware of your environment.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Weird. I didn’t realize that people may be more prone than others.

Hector Chapa:
Absolutely. Now, as we get into the end of our little discussion, we’ve covered two main issues, infection with yeast, both internally or externally on the skin and bacteria, but there’s another issue is if you’re going to a pool, which let’s assume this is our population right now. Swimming, so we’re still in summer, and those chemicals in the pool stay on that bathing suit. So, persistent contact, especially against very delicate skin, intimate skin in that area for both men and women, those chemicals that are used in that pool stay on that material. The water evaporates, but what leaves behind is that residue. That can give you contact dermatitis, that exposure and persistence of those chemicals near very vulnerable, not even skin. The medical term for that area is mucosa. That delicate area, that’s a wick. We don’t want those things in our body.

We’re all so health conscious now and I love how you go into a pool full of chemicals and you stay in your bathing suit for three hours later, but you eat your organic treat. Come on guys, you got to do everything. If you’re going to take care of yourself, take care of yourself holistically, and get out of that wet bathing suit.

Sam Craft:
Don’t dive into a pool full of chlorine and everything else in the world.

Hector Chapa:
Right. Then look for preservatives in your food. That’s great. But come on, we’ve got to do…

Sam Craft:
Gluten-free only, please.

Hector Chapa:
Please, only.

Sam Craft:
Don’t want to get a tummy ache.

Hector Chapa:
Nope, nope, nope. But I’m going to leave the chemicals right here.

Sam Craft:
Okay.

Hector Chapa:
It’s all perspective really.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Is that why you still smell like chlorine after?

Hector Chapa:
Great question. Absolutely. It’s on your skin, so you’re supposed…

Sam Craft:
Probably in your skin.

Hector Chapa:
Think about it.

Sam Craft:
Doesn’t it absorb?

Hector Chapa:
What happens to usually women’s hair, and I say women’s hair because longer hair, typically. If go into a pool repetitively and don’t shower it out, it becomes dry. The consistency changes and it becomes lighter. Those are the chemical effect. Well think about that in our skin. It’s just overall good health care for you. Just good, again, personal hygiene to change out of that suit and rinse that off. That’s why at the beach, what is there?

Sam Craft:
Little showers.

Hector Chapa:
Always. That’s for you. Yes, it’s for the sand. It’s also to rinse that stuff off.

Sam Craft:
That’s not for the sand?

Hector Chapa:
Well, sand’s another issue, but…oh, that’s a good point though. Let’s say you’re at the beach. That sand gets in places that sand shouldn’t necessarily be, and that’s a true physical irritant.

So look at the boxes we’ve covered. We’ve covered infectious, we’ve covered chemical exposure and then true physical exposures like sand. That little sand is sandpaper. So, as it gives you micro-abrasions, things work together. You’ve got the micro-abrasion of the sand, you’ve got the bacteria from the bathing suit, the chemical. So now you’re not looking for opportunities, you’re just inviting it, please give me an infection. If you let it, it’ll take advantage of it.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
One of my favorite things to do at the beach is I go in the water, I get cooled off, then I like to lay out and I like the water to evaporate. Then I’ll get hot, then I’ll go back into the water and then I’ll come back and I’ll dry off again. Then I just repeat and repeat and repeat.

Sam Craft:
Like a normal day at the beach.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Yeah.

Hector Chapa:
So like 99.98 do.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
So is that exactly what we’re not supposed to do?

Hector Chapa:
Well, so that’s a good point. So, you have to, and again, I know you’re listening, you’re like, “oh great, well, that just messed up my whole day.”

Sam Craft:
You forgot the sunscreen part, which is super important too. We talked about that a few weeks ago.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
That’s interesting because that’s a good chemical you put on your skin.

Sam Craft:
That’s my point.

Hector Chapa:
That’s a podcast in two weeks, let’s say.

Sam Craft:
We’ve already done a sunscreen one. That’s what I’m saying. Sorry, we’re off topic.

Hector Chapa:
No, but it’s a good point because here’s the issue. Guys, enjoy life. My goodness. Still have fun, but do it consciously. Do it with a health-conscious awareness, that’s all. When you get out, sure, rinse off. If there’s sand trapped in, just try to get that out.

Hector Chapa:
Do what you can to eliminate or a compromise. I tell the kids, if you come out of the ocean, for example, at the beach, they got to go rinse off then go lie down. You can do that. It’s how do you minimize exposure? You’re exposed. We’re exposed to stuff every day. That’s okay, but how do you minimize that and be aware of it? That’s what we’re trying to get into. Enjoy the day.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
That’s so refreshing to hear it from a physician.

Hector Chapa:
Enjoy the day.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
All I hear is don’t eat too many brownies or don’t go out in the sun too long.

Hector Chapa:
What’s the word? Moderation.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Yeah. Everything I like in life.

Sam Craft:
Watch out for sharks. There’s been lots of shark attacks recently.

Hector Chapa:
Well, shark attacks and the, what else? We talked about this before we actually went live.

Sam Craft:
The flesh-eating bacteria.

Hector Chapa:
See guys?

Sam Craft:
That is something that is in the news. I’ve seen probably three or four cases at least this year.

Hector Chapa:
It’s not just Gulf Coast. It’s not just Texas Gulf Coast, all the way to Florida. So, this is the issue. Think about it, that bacteria, obviously more of an issue in susceptible people, but here’s the catch. Ready? I’m healthy. I work out, I eat my gluten-free…I’m not throwing gluten-free under the bus.

Sam Craft:
It’s a good example.

Hector Chapa:
But yeah, for sure. I’m healthy. But as we know that in the U.S. and abroad, just the trend has been over the last really 20 years for personal pubic area grooming, just the way it is. Well, what happens to that skin? You get micro-abrasions. That’s why from a gynecology perspective, yes, there’s articles for this, shaving, fine, knock yourself out, but you’re going to get little micro-tears in the skin. That’s why new blade. You got to invest in that to protect your skin, or clip. Use a little clipper, so that the skin roots aren’t damaged, but things like waxing, depilatories or shaving can damage the skin. Then you put yourself into that environment, even though you’re healthy, you work out, now you vulnerable. So, this is why this is a big issue in gynecology. For example, in gynecological surgery, we used to shave our patients pubic area for C-sections or vaginal cases of course, with a razor. Well, part of overall surgical care is that’s not done anymore. We either leave it or if it’s in the way, then we use electric clippers to clip the skin so that the skin is down just millimeters. But the skin actually is not pulled out. Why? Because we give less skin trauma.

Sam Craft:
The skin or the hair?

Hector Chapa:
The hair, so that the skin is not affected by pulling out the hair. So, we’ve gone from shaving with razors to electric razors or just leaving it alone. Because why? We know that these micro-tears, nothing like doing a great surgery and then you end up with a skin infection from your surgical shaving prep before. Did that happen? Absolutely. So, this is a mandate now, all relating to what we’re talking about. See how we came in the door talking about wet bathing suits. It’s personal hygiene and again, nothing wrong with personal grooming at all, but if you’re going to do that, you need to self-check. Do I have a little nick? Maybe not the best to go into Galveston Bay, and not throwing Galveston Bay under, but as an example, where you may be more prone to an infection.

Sam Craft:
Well, any kind of large body of water with bacteria.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Absolutely.

Hector Chapa:
The Gulf is stagnant. That’s what it is. There’s no exit and that’s why the Gulf, because water doesn’t circulate there as much as an open conduit, that’s why infections tend to be more present in non-moving bodies.

Sam Craft:
For the flesh-eating bacteria or just bacteria in general, it doesn’t have to be an open wound or a cut to get into you.

Hector Chapa:
No.

Sam Craft:
Those are just the usually the most successful.

Hector Chapa:
Absolutely. An infected hair follicle, little things that you take for granted, in the susceptible person. There was one case, again, just not the best decision. The person was a cancer patient, and just had finished several rounds of treatment, and well-meaning and I totally understand…who wouldn’t sympathize? I’m going to go to the beach and enjoy my, absolutely well thought of, but probably not the right time.

Sam Craft:
Their immune system, I’m sure, is still pretty lowered.

Hector Chapa:
Oh man, it did not work out well. This is why, we’ve got to live, but you’ve got to live with responsibility and do the right thing. I would have, as a physician, no, go, enjoy the beach. Put your feet in, but you got to watch that. You’re immune compromised. Guys. Life is hard. We need to enjoy it. We need to take every opportunity to live to the full, but we also need to be careful and responsible for our health.

So as we get to the end here, I just want to thank everybody for taking the time to bring this up, and you thought it was boring, didn’t you? You said it was going to be boring. Wasn’t necessarily that boring.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
I didn’t say it was going to be boring. I said it was going to be…

Sam Craft:
Challenging. It’s challenging.

Hector Chapa:
Challenging, sure. But you know what?

Mary Leigh Meyer:
…educational.

Hector Chapa:
I think that we take for granted, things that we take for granted, sitting in a wet bathing suit. What the heck does that have to do with anything? Health. It just does. Little things that you, once you take a look at it and really dive into it, something as mundane as just sitting in a wet bathing suit, which, I just have to share with you right now. I’m sitting in a wet bathing suit right now. I just wanted to throw that in there.

Sam Craft:
There’s no judgment here whatsoever. I’m actually somewhat jealous…

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Except a little.

Hector Chapa:
Nobody knows what’s under the desk. That’s the whole advantage of doing a podcast.

Sam Craft:
If there’s a pool under my desk, somebody needs to say something because there’s definitely not.

Hector Chapa:
Just a joke, guys. Not sitting in a wet bathing suit.

Sam Craft:
Going to need some Mai Tais or something like that.

Hector Chapa:
But you can see how every topic literally can have great implications for our health. So well done. Thank you.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
So many more than I thought of. I came in just thinking it was a myth.

Hector Chapa:
No.

Sam Craft:
I’d just never, I thought just wrinkly skin was it. I thought that’s all we get out of it.

Hector Chapa:
Right.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
And it can happen to men too.

Hector Chapa:
Absolutely. Except the vagina.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Some of it.

Hector Chapa:
Yeah, for sure.

Sam Craft:
Except that part. We don’t have those parts.

Hector Chapa:
All right guys, well, I enjoyed it and we’ll look forward to our next session.

Mary Leigh Meyer:
Thank you again for coming in and this has been another episode of Sounds Like Health! Thank you all for listening.