Tag

Commercialization

Texas A&M and Celltex enter agreement for Alzheimer’s research

February 6, 2018
Celltex acquires intellectual property license, signs multi-year research study with Texas A&M Health Science Center

Harnessing commercialization

February 5, 2018
Newer, faster paths for biomedical research discoveries to reach patients

Engineering a better drug delivery system

December 18, 2017
Solving the biggest problems in medicine may require an engineering approach

Using iron ions to disinfect hospital rooms

July 7, 2016
Researchers work to revolutionize how health care institutions clean surfaces

Texas A&M planning to create medical school for physician engineers at Houston Methodist Hospital

June 24, 2016
Program will produce “physicianeers” who will radically change the way that health care is delivered

Texas A&M spin-off, Pulmotect, Inc., receives $3 million NIH grant to fund infection prevention drug trials

May 26, 2015

Clinical-stage biotechnology company Pulmotect, Inc., has been awarded a $3 million grant from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of PUL-042, an inhaled therapeutic designed to prevent and treat respiratory infections in cancer patients with compromised immune systems.

International collaboration and innovative partnerships with industry, government, speeding bench-to-bedside discoveries

May 13, 2015

Whether it’s an inhaled therapeutic that stimulates innate immunity of the lungs to prevent the spread of bacterial and viral infections, or a novel tuberculosis test that allows doctors to diagnose the infectious disease within minutes, the partnerships between academic institutions, their spinoff companies, industry, and government are the driving force behind advancing these products to the market — and on faster timelines than ever before.

Speeding discoveries from bench to bedside

April 10, 2015

Biomedical research should ultimately benefit patients. That’s the driving force behind the work being done by LauraLee Hughes and her staff in the Texas A&M Health Science Center’s Office of Technology Translation (OTT).