Texas A&M Health Science Center welcomes clinical operation strategist

Steven Brown, MD, comes home to Texas A&M with a new practice plan
December 20, 2017

Steven D. Brown, ‘77, ‘79, MD a nationally recognized leader in clinical operations management, will join Texas A&M Health Science Center to lead a new comprehensive approach to clinical strategy and education effective January 1, 2018.

Brown, formerly the vice president of clinical operations for the 7,600 employed provider Trinity Health Provider Network, will now serve Texas A&M as the chief clinical officer and associate vice president of clinical strategy for the Health Science Center and chief clinical officer and professor with the Texas A&M College of Medicine.

“We’re honored that Dr. Brown has agreed to join our team and create a new clinical structure for Texas A&M,” said Carrie L. Byington, MD, dean of the Texas A&M College of Medicine, senior vice president of the Texas A&M University Health Science Center and vice chancellor for health services at The Texas A&M University System. “His expertise in health care networks and ability to effectively oversee group practice with an eye on population health will be invaluable for our educational approach and our responsibility to improve health care for all Texans.”

Brown will lead an initiative to create a practice plan for the Health Science Center that integrates licensed providers from all five health sciences colleges. The integrated practice will serve as a platform for research and education for students and residents from across the health professions to better prepare them for practice in America’s changing healthcare environment.

“I’m excited to help craft a compelling vision to incorporate research, education, student teaching and residency teaching in a team approach consistent with the direction of value-based care and payment systems, and the opportunity to vastly improve the quality of care for patients,” Brown said.

Brown explains that this new practice plan will create a new educational paradigm that relies on a team-based construct that incorporates research at the outset. He adds that this new plan will strengthen the Health Science Center’s comprehensive identity, and uniquely leverage the School of Public Health’s expertise from the outset to make a new approach to education and treatment that helps Texas A&M have a greater impact in the communities the colleges reach.

“Traditional teaching systems have often taught the health professions in their own silos, but with team-based approaches using carefully defined roles and relationships and evidence-based protocols, the provider doesn’t have to be relied on for every decision,” Brown said.

Brown also added that this new role and practice plan helps bring the Health Science Center’s priorities centered on rural population health, military health and engineering health to life.

“Health education systems must develop and teach efficient and cost-effective means to provide care with the highest quality and lowest possible cost, and to be respectful of the resources of our state and our country’s people,” Brown said. “The system that we envision would have a presence from all the colleges, with School of Public Health support for research on policy, best practices, analytics and outcomes, and community engagement mobilization for the most at-risk populations.”

Before joining Trinity Health’s system office team, Brown’s prior experience included service as vice president and chief medical officer for Trinity Health’s Saint Alphonsus Health System, a four-hospital health system in Oregon and Idaho, and president of the Saint Alphonsus Medical Group. He previously concluded a 19-year career with the University of Texas as an associate dean and tenured professor at UT Health in Houston. He holds two degrees from Texas A&M and received his MD from the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and is board certified in internal medicine with added certifications in pulmonary and critical care medicine.

— Katherine Hancock

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